Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery Toronto, Canada.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Sahar Ghannam

International Society of Dermatologic Surgery, Canada

Keynote: A dual pulse NDYag laser for the management of hyperpigmented body areas

Time : 10:20-10:45

OMICS International Plastic & Aesthetic 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sahar Ghannam photo
Biography:

Sahar Ghannam was graduated in 1983 from Alexandria University Egypt with a Master Degree of Dermatology, Venereology & Andrology in 1986. She receivedrna PhD in 1994 with a thesis on chronological aging, photo aging and ionizing radiation effects on the skin in 1995 a board examination was passed to successfullyrnachieve Doctorate Degree of Dermatology Venereology & Andrology. During that time, she upscaled in the University positions from a Teacher Assistant untilrnAssociate Professor in Alexandria University. Since that time, she has been interested in aging and anti-aging procedures. She is a Board Member of thernInternational Society of Dermatologic surgery ISDS and the Executive Director of the International Peeling Society IPS. She is the co-author of the Chemical Peelrnchapter in the 3rd edition of “Surgery of the Skin” published by Elsevier. He has published over 20 scientific papers. She is the Editorial Advisory Board of the IndianrnJournal of Dermatology and the Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology. She travels a lot lecturing and teaching but also learning

Abstract:

Post Eruptive hyperpigmentation is very common in Middle Eastern women due to their deviated skin type. The pigmentationrnwhich affects extra-facial parts is usually difficult to treat locally with creams like the axilla and back. A novel device usingrntwo different sets of 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser parameters has been developed in combination with a topical carbon lotion.rnFollowing topical local anesthesia, a topical carbon lotion was applied to the area to be treated and a Q-switched frequencydoubledrnNd:YAG laser was used first in a quasi-long pulsed mode (a 300-ms pulse width at 1.1–1.5 J/cm2) followed immediatelyrnby a Q-switched mode (5-nsec pulse width, 1.5–2.0J/cm2) using a 7-mm hand piece for both modes. The procedure was welltolerated.rnA Pre and every 4 session photo were taken to evaluate the response. Most patients were satisfied with the results,rnthe author will show the causes of these hyper-pigmentations and the procedure will be discussed with pre and post results.

Keynote Forum

Sameer Bafaqeeh

King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Keynote: Experience in avoiding and managing revision rhinoplasty

Time : 10:45-11:10

OMICS International Plastic & Aesthetic 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sameer Bafaqeeh photo
Biography:

Sameer Bafaqeeh is a Professor and Consultant at Department of Otolaryngology and Chairman of Facial Plastic Division. He is Director of King Saud Facial PlasticrnFellowship program and Chairman of Annual International Riyadh Rhinoplasty & Otoplasty Course, at King Saud University.

Abstract:

Revision Rhinoplasty is one of the most challenging facial plastic surgical procedures. Many of our referral unhappy or dissatisfied revision cases have been to the plastic surgeon for their primary assessment or their first surgery and referredrnto us for both functional and aesthetic correction of their iatrogenic deformities after having had their primary surgery by the plastic surgeon. Additionally, there are usually psychological issues that need to understand and deal with to achieve a satisfactory outcome, assessment and careful pre-operative analysis remains the key for any successful revision Rhinoplasty surgery. The best form of treatment is prevention. This requires an understanding of the complex anatomy and physiology of the nose. The external approach is applied for most revision cases, which offers several advantages: direct visualization of underlying anatomic structures, adequate diagnosis of the existing deformity and exact placement of grafts and implants. The treatment is also multifactorial: Osteotomy and rasp techniques are used to realign; (intact, crushed, diced, or morsilized) cartilage grafts are used to fill in, camouflage, smooth out, elevate, and contour different defects. In severe cases irradiated rib cartilage or alloplastic Gore- Tex in Fascia lata are used to fill in large defects when other grafting options are not available. The most common postoperative Rhinoplasty deformities encountered are described and how they can be corrected is presented, with pearls for preventing such problems.

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break @ Foyer 11:10-11:25

Keynote Forum

Tanongsak Panyawirunroj

Asia Cosmetic Hospital Co., Ltd., Thailand

Keynote: Minimal invasive TANONGSAK technique for reduction malarplasty

Time : 11:25-11:50

OMICS International Plastic & Aesthetic 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tanongsak Panyawirunroj photo
Biography:

Tanongsak Panyawirunroj is a Founder, a Chairman, and the Principal Surgeon at Asia Cosmetic Hospital Thailand, The Best Plastic Surgery in Thailand. Hernspecializes in Maxillofacial surgery, Breast augmentation, Face Change – from male to female, Rhinoplasty, Liposuction, Sex Change – from male to female, etc.rnHe has many certifications for various domains such as: Micro-vascular surgery, plastic surgery, maxilla-facial surgery, aesthetic surgery and pediatric surgery. Hernchose as his Alma Mater the Siriraj Hospital Medical College of Mahidol University (Bangkok, Thailand). He has earned the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1998.rnFurthermore, he has been winning and earning many more awards, trophies and certificates. The recent award was The Best Manager Awards 2015, MedicalrnSphere (Socrates Awards 2015) by Europe Business Assembly.

Abstract:

Background: Southeast Asian women prefer oval shape facial contour. To achieve this goal, there are a lot of procedures tornreshape the facial skeleton. Reduction malarplasty is a common operation. Although multiple techniques have been developedrnfor reduction malarplasty, this study presents a new less invasive TANONGSAK technique for reduction malarplasty.rnMethods: Between January 2015 and December 2015, we applied TANONGSAK technique for reduction malarplasty in 38rnpatients. TANONGSAK technique was performed osteotomy site at zygomatic arch with 12 mm in length preauricular incisionrnand at Zygomatic body with 25 mm in length intraoral incision by a reciprocating saw. Out site-in Closed reduction wasrnperformed to reposition of malar bone complex. Internal fixation was not required.rnResults: The patients were followed up for 5 to 183 days postoperatively (mean 39 days). 94% of patients (36 patients) hadrnsatisfactory aesthetic results. The facial contour reduction was accomplished 0.1%-13.79% (mean 2.46%) in size reduction.rnThe operative time in each case was less than 60 minutes. The mean hospital stay was 1.1 day (1-2 day) and patients requiredrnrecovery period 2-14 days (mean 8.7 days) .2 of patients developed temporary inferior orbital nerve injury. No facial nerverninjury and no any other postoperative complications.rnConclusion: Minimal invasive TANONGSAK reduction malarplasty is a preferable technique. This technique providesrnmultiple advantages, including simple manipulation, less invasive, short incision, no internal fixation, good stability, achievedrnaesthetic results, short operative and recovery time, and less complications.

  • Facial Rejuvenation
    Non-Surgical Aesthetic Procedures
    Cosmetic Surgery
    Rhinoplasty and Otoplasty
    Reconstructive Surgery
Location: Trillium A
Speaker

Chair

Sahar Ghannam

International Society of Dermatologic Surgery, Canada

Speaker

Co-Chair

Sameer Bafaqeeh

King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Speaker
Biography:

Colin P White has completed his Plastic Surgery Residency from McMaster University and completed separate fellowships in hand, microsurgery, crainofacial and breast reconstruction. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been in independent practice for 2 years in British Columbia

Abstract:

The wise pattern vs. vertical scar pattern breast reduction has been long argued. The advantages and disadvantages of each are well. A recent randomized controlled trail of the wise pattern vs. the vertical pattern reduction failed to show any drastic differences with regards to clinically outcome but it did show that the vertical type pattern was consistently shorter in operation time. We show a technique which combines the best aspects of the wise and vertical pattern reductions. In this technique, we use a typical superior medical pedicle that would be typically used in a vertical pattern and use a skin incision and tissue resection pattern of that of a wise type pattern. By doing this hybrid pattern, the surgeon is able to utilize advantages of the two well known reduction types. The hybrid reduction uses a robust and reliable superior type pedicle which also allows for a quick de epithelization and dissection of the pedicle. By using the Wise type anchor shaped skin incision a large amount of tissue is able to be harvested and the breast projection is restored and is asethetically favorable. We show step by step marking and surgical tips to conduct a surgery with a favorable cosmetic outcome. We also show surgical tips such as dealing with the dog ear from a vertical limb and also shortening pedicle length in order to give long lasting results.

Speaker
Biography:

Maryam Borumand is an advanced Aesthetics Practitioner who specializes in non-surgical treatments. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science from Kings’ College London, a PhD in Biochemistry from University of East Anglia, and a Post-graduate Diploma in Physician Associate Studies from University of Birmingham. She is a member of the Royal College of Physicians and is part of the Editorial Board for the Journal of Procedural Dermatology. Since 2010, she worked in General Practice for over an year and then at a number of Clinical Research Organizations, before setting up her aesthetics business, YouGlo.

Abstract:

Dermal fillers have become an integral part of aesthetic practice. Commonly the practitioner may undertake one or two days of training in this field before they set out on their own. However, it is now becoming increasingly recognized that this short period of training may not be sufficient to equip a practitioner with the knowledge they need to provide the best practice. One of the techniques most commonly taught by injectors is massaging after injection. This knowledge is widespread in textbooks and online. However, it is important to remember that it is the special viscoelastic properties of fillers that provide augmentation of soft tissues. When injecting a dermal filler, the tissue alters in form depending on injection direction. Excessive massaging, may not only disrupt the properties of the filler, but can also disrupt the shape and form of the tissue. Previous studies have shown that the injection pressure causes the filler to flow naturally towards an area that deforms more easily i.e. the hypodermis. Deformation of the tissue matrix in this region stimulate mechanoreceptors on fibroblasts, which then convert the mechanical signal into an intracellular biochemical signal involving molecular transformations that cause changes in the biochemical parameters in the dermis such as collagen and enzymes. Small injection sites allow even distribution of multiple volumes of filler within the hypodermis, which in turn leads to uniform level of mechanical stress exerted in the dermis.

Tatjana Bogdanova

Dr. Med. E. Jurshevich’s Clinic of Aesthetic Medicine, Latvia

Title: The main causes of aesthetic and functional complications after the rhinoplasty
Speaker
Biography:

Tatjana Bogdanova completed her PhD from Riga Stradiņš University in 1989 and Post-doctoral studies as an Otorhinolaringologist from Riga Stradiņs University. She works in Dr. Med. E Jurshevich’s Clinic of Aesthetic Medicine as the ENT doctor. She is a member of Latvian Otorhinolaringologists Society, ERS (European Rhinologists Society) and RhSoEu (Rhinoplasty Society of Europe). She published the abstracts for Baltic Otolaringologists Congress and annual RhSoEu members meetings.

Abstract:

Popularity of the nasal aesthetic surgery increases year by year, through this, unfortunately, grows the number of complications. The aim of this study is to systematize the complications after the rhinoseptoplasty and establish the cause-consequence bond between aesthetic and functional problems, arising after endonasal functional operations, as well as after only aesthetic interventions. 119 cases of revision rhino/rhinoseptoplasty were analyzed for period 2009-2015 in our clinic (102 female and 17 male in age range 24-63 years). 68 patients previously undergone aesthetic rhinoplasty (13 of them – repeatedly), 24 patients had functional-aesthetic operation (rhinoplasty and mainly sub-mucosal resection of nasal septum by Killian) and 27 patients undergone only sub-mucosal resection of nasal septum by Killian. 91.7% of patients were previously operated in different clinics. In result, after the questioning and objective examination (nasal endoscopy, rhinomanometry, CT scan), 38 patients had only aesthetic problems, 5 patients had functional and most of the patients (76) – had both. 68 revision rhinoplasty and 51 revision rhinoseptoplasty (18 of which by extra-corporal reconstructive septoplasty, 24 – by subtotal septoplasty, 9 – by septoplasty in situ) were made with a good result and with elimination of aesthetic and functional problems. The complications after the rhinoseptoplasty can be divided to aesthetic and functional. However, principal number of patients (according to our study) has both types of complications. It confirms the fact, that rhinoplasty is the operation, that is situated at the intersection of the plastic surgery and ENT surgery, that, unfortunately, causes a lot of problems for patients. In this way, the successful result of rhinoplasty directly depends on plastic surgeon’s skill to operate not only external nose, but also internal nose. On the other hand, during the functional procedure, it always important to understand the consequences of one or another change of the nasal support structures to the form of the external nose.

Dominik L Feinendegen,

Swiss Society for Aesthetic Surgery, Switzerland

Title: Scarless brow reduction surgery
Speaker
Biography:

Dominik L Feinendegen has taken plastic surgical training at the University Hospital Berne. In 1997, he worked as the Registrar at the Mount Vernon Hospital in London. In 1998, as the Assistant Medical Director at the Bellevue Clinique in Zurich and from 1999 until 2001, he was the Head of the Department at the University Hospital of Erlangen-Nürnberg. Since 2001, he was the Founder and Director of the Institute of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery in Zurich. He was the Lecturer and Instructor for international training courses and seminars and new plastic surgical techniques, published within peer-reviewed international journals. He received awards for the development of the “subcostal artery perforator flap”: 2005 from EURAPS, 2010 from the Swiss Society for Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery. In 2012, he was the founding member of the Swiss Society for Aesthetic Surgery.

Abstract:

So far, there are no reports in the realm of medical literature which particularly describe from a surgical point of view any brow reduction technique. As up to this day, brow reduction has only be analysed and investigated from a non-surgical point of view. The following paper aims to fill into this lack of research and will introduce a new surgical brow reduction technique with less scar formation. By doing this, the paper questions the present treatment of brow forming and contributes to new insights in surgical procedures and contributes to present academic literature. The reluctance to form the brow surgically might be the prevailing medical opinion and experience of noticeable scar formation following reduction of brow fullness and brow symmetrization or direct brow lift procedures. The use of the ‘flat incision technique’ proposed in this article can alleviate these visible sequelae following incisions in the brow area. With this technique the brow can be directly reduced in size and/or simultaneously elevated, especially to feminize or harmonize the brow form. The brow rows are deliberately reduced which leads to nearly invisible scar formation. Compared to the vertical skin incision the herein described flat incision technique increases the dermal wound layers more than a double. By maximization of these dermal layers the scar quality is remarkably improved. Hair growth can be maintained through the incision line by sparing the hair follicles. This technique was prospectively evaluated in a series of 18 patients with surgery performed by one surgeon in one center. All patients showed good to excellent scar formation with exception of 2 heavy smokers. The subjective rating of the results was very good in fourteen patients, good in two patients and poor in two patients.

Break: Lunch Break @ Trillium C 13:10-13:55
Speaker
Biography:

Minoru Arakaki has completed his PhD from Nagasaki University and Post-doctoral studies from Nagasaki University School of Medicine. He is currently the President of Arakaki Plastic Surgery. He is a certified board of JPRS and a counselor of JSAPS. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals. He is the specialist of Hair Restoration Therapy in Japan.

Abstract:

Recently, Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) topical injection therapy is reported to be efficient for women hair loss but its effect is still not enough. And also the patients may fall into anemia because of repeated drawing blood. The mechanism of PRP is to provide growth factors around the cell and up-regulate cell function so they have to continue signaling to maintain cell function. Therefore concept of controlled release carrier is focused by engineers and researchers all over the world and they have developed many kinds of drag carriers but are still expensive or under research so they are not suit for clinical use. Takikawa et al reported new cheap carrier containing PRP using conventional injectable drugs. They use Dalteparin and protamine micro-particles (D/P MPs) as the carrier for PRP and investigate the duration and the enhanced effects of PRP. It can be make easily with common technique and materials in the clinic operation room. Author reports the small clinical experiences of Controlled Release PRP therapy for women hair-loss. Further investigation and improvement will be needed but the result supports the efficacy of the controlled release PRP therapy. It can be useful for not only hair growth but also rejuvenation skin therapy.

  • Plastic Surgery
    Rhinoplasty and Otoplasty
    Reconstructive Surgery
Location: Trillium A
Speaker

Chair

Tanongsak Panyawirunroj

Asia Cosmetic Hospital Co., Ltd., Thailand

Speaker

Co-Chair

Thomas Biesgen

Mutterhaus Trier, Germany

Speaker
Biography:

Thomas Biesgen received his MD at Heidelberg University 2000 and after his training in world-known departments (e.g. UCLA, Los Angeles, University Bordeaux, Paris, Munich, Toronto), he passed the board exams 2007 in plastic, reconstructive and aesthetic surgery in Munich. During the last years, he has gained extraordinary experiences in different countries and he sub-specialized in hand surgery, reconstruction of the upper limb/reconstructive microsurgery, including breast reconstruction and aesthetic surgery, finally as Consultant at the University Hospital Cambridge, UK and University Hospital BG Tübingen in Germany. From January 2015, he become Head of the Department in Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery at Mutterhaus Trier, University Mainz, Germany. He has authored many national and international lectures as invited speaker and lectured at top-ranked international universities. He taught at several charity organizations (Interplast Germany and Interplast UK) during Interplast missions in different countries in the world (Uganda, Pakistan, India, etc.), including organizing of operation courses in third world countries.

Abstract:

The presentation shows different operative possibilities for the reconstruction of the anal-vaginal region after large tumor excision. Some reconstructions are done by VY-gluteus-flap and Gracilis-flaps to reconstruct the inguinal region and the anal area. The different techniques for the reconstruction are presented by pre-, intra- and post-operative pictures include the postoperative outcome. The advantages/disadvantages for each operative procedure will be discussed.

Claudio A Guerra

Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile

Title: Overview in post bariatric body contouring
Speaker
Biography:

Claudio A Guerra has completed his graduation from Universidad de Chile Medical School. He got trained in General Surgery and practiced for 5 years before starting his training in Plastic Surgery. He was a research Fellow at University of Alabama from July 2009 to February 2011. He currently works at Universidad Católica de Chile in the Plastic Surgery Unit performing most of the post bariatric surgery refered to the unit.

Abstract:

Overweight and obesity have become common health problems, which has increased the number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery. After the weight loss, the last step in the comprehensive treatment of obesity is the body contouring surgery. There are different surgical techniques, depending on the area to be treated and the patient's features and expectations. The current state of post bariatric body contouring surgery will be presented, with an overview of the preoperative evaluation and planning, the timing of the procedures and the strategy to achieve good results with safe surgery. A thorough and complete preoperative evaluation is crucial to define the best time to perform post bariatric plastic surgery, and to design a surgical strategy to address adequately the needs of these patients. Obtaining an accurate history is essential to establish whether the patient is at the optimal time for body contouring surgery, with a stable weight of at least 4 months, and an adequate nutritional condition to achieve lasting results over time. A very important issue to discuss with the patient is the extent and location of scars and the postoperative course they may have. The limitations of surgery have to be clearly explained and the patient must understand these surgeries as a process, considering staged procedures as a realistic strategy in terms of safety and results. The risk of thromboembolic events, bleeding, need of transfusions, infections must be discussed so the patient has all the information he or she needs in order to make a well informed decision. A careful medical evaluation and surgical planning are important to offer procedures with predictable results keeping safety as a main concern.

Speaker
Biography:

Carrie S Stern completed her Medical degree from New York University Medical Center and then pursued her residency training in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Montefiore Medical Center of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Given her previous research interests in simulation and technology in plastic surgery, coupled with her entrepreneurial interests, she decided to launch MirrorMe3D, a company dedicated to bringing 3D printing to cosmetic surgery. She has co-authored 20+ manuscripts in peer reviewed journals and 50+ presentations and national and international conferences to date.

Abstract:

One of the most important parts of the plastic surgery consultation is aligning patient and surgeon goals. Plastic surgeons have been using simulation software as part of their consultation to help show patients what they might look like after cosmetic surgery. Despite the more recent use of 3D photography and simulation, patients still have difficulty visualizing proposed changes on a 2D computer screen. 3D printing, which is an emerging technology in various sectors including health care, may help bridge this gap. We have begun to incorporate 3D printing technology in the care of aesthetic patients. 3D prints are provided by MirrorMe3D, which offers products to surgeons and patient, including full face, facial subunit (i.e. nose) and breast models. 3D printing offers a number of benefits to doctors, including marketing and branding, as well as potential increased patient conversion rates. We have found the most useful procedures have been for rhinoplasty and breast augmentation. Baseline models are used at initial consultation to describe the deformity and educate patients on the goals and expectations of surgery. Baseline and simulated models can be used as an educational tool, but can also be utilized as a reference for intraoperative guidance. We have found this latter application particularly useful as it supplements, and may ultimately replace, the standard 2D photos currently used. 3D printing can add value to many aspects of a cosmetic surgery practice, including branding, marketing, education, conversion rates, and surgical planning.

J Bouguila

La Rabta University Hospital, Tunisia

Title: Complex scalp defects
Speaker
Biography:

J Bouguila is Assistant Professor at La Rabta University Hospital, Tunisia. He completed Medical Doctor (MD) in Tunis-Tunisia in the year 2007; he completed Diploma of specialist in Maxillo-Facial Surgery at Tunis-Tunisia in year 2008, and Oral Implantology & Academic diploma of Microsurgery at Lyon-France during 2008-2009. He specialized in Formation Attestation in Plastic and Aesthetic surgery (SFA), Diploma of Facial Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Hair Transplantation & Orthognathic Surgery at Lyon-France during 2009-2010. He was the French Board of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery at Paris-France during 2010-2011.

Abstract:

Introduction: Defects of the scalp may result from trauma, tumor resection, infections, congenital lesions and radiation treatment. Large and complex defects extending to bone can represent a significant challenge to the reconstructive head and neck surgeon. We here present our experience in the treatment of complex scalp defects. Material & Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of patients treated for complex defects of the scalp in the Department of Maxillo-Facial and Plastic Surgery in Sahloul Hospital (Sousse-Tunisia). Data studied were: Epidemiological (age, sex), etiologies, characteristics of the defect, surgical procedures and outcomes. Results: A total of 6 male patients have undergone reconstruction for defects in the anterior scalp subunits (forehead=1, fronto-temporal=3, parietal=1, parieto-temporal=1). The average age of patients was 53 years (min 25 years and max 81 years). The scalp defects resulted either from: tumor resection (2 patients); post-traumatic loss of the scalp (3 patients) and; electric burn (1 patient). As a surgical reconstruction; galea-aponeurotic flaps and split-thickness skin grafting were done in 2 cases, a temporal muscular flap was performed in 1 case and a latissimus dorsi free flap was performed in 2 cases. Conclusion: Scalp reconstruction represents a challenge, as the reconstructive surgeon should strive for a cosmetically appealing result as well as for durable coverage to the exposed cranium. Although local flaps have been described for the reconstruction of these defects, free flaps are the preferred choice when a significant area of soft tissue coverage is required or when the defect concerns the bone.

Troy R Hailparn

Cosmetic Gynecology Center of San Antonio, USA

Title: ThermiVa® for vulvovaginal rejuvenation-San Antonio experience
Biography:

Troy R Hailparn has done over 2000 vaginal procedures and over 750 labiaplasties, and has had extensive advanced education in cosmetic-plastic gynecology. She is an international leader in the field having participated in the historic first two scientific sessions in cosmetic-plastic gynecology at major international meetings, the first in Hainan, China at the 15th World Congress on Controversies in Obstetrics, Gynecology and Infertility (COGI) in December, 2011, and the second, at the prestigious International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO) in Rome, Italy, in October, 2012, to help recognize and validate the needs of women everywhere. She is the author of the recently released online educational eModule for her colleagues through the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) on the Labia Minora and Labia Minora Labiaplasty Procedures, and has published articles in reputed journals as well as serves as a scientific peer journal reviewer. She lectures locally and nationally, and holds courses throughout the year on Vulvar and Vaginal Cosmetic Gynecologic Procedures through the American Society of Cosmetic Physicians.

Abstract:

Introduction: The use of radiofrequency technology to treat vulvovaginal problems including incontinence, atrophic vaginitis, damage from childbirth, and aesthetic concerns of the labia majora has been introduced in the last year, and has promise as a non-surgical vaginal rejuvenation option for women. Objective: To assess the clinical and subjective effects of ThermiVa® on stress and urge incontinence, painful intercourse due to atrophic vaginitis, sensation changes from childbirth, and saggy labia majora causing cosmetic concerns. Materials & Methods: Female patients presenting for non-surgical treatment of vulvovaginal concerns from August 2015 through April 2016 were counseled on and offered ThermiVa®. Risks and complications and alternative treatments were discussed. All were offered 3 treatments 4-6 weeks apart. Consents were obtained for treatments, before and after photographs, videos and testimonials. Results: 35 patients were included. 3 had only 1 treatment, 7 have had 2 treatments and 25 have completed 3 treatments. All who had 2 and 3 treatments except one have had improvement in all of their symptoms as well as with the cosmetic appearance of their labia majora. The one patient had painful intercourse due to vaginal dryness and presented on combination hormones at the age of 44. She still complained of painful intercourse and vaginal dryness after three treatments and a discussion of changing her hormonal regimen ensued and a trial of vaginal estrogen started. Conclusion: ThermiVa® appears to positively impact the urinary, dryness, and sensation symptoms and cosmetic concerns in the majority of women treated and is an excellent non-surgical vaginal rejuvenation option for women.

Speaker
Biography:

Neelam A Vashi, MD, FAAD is a board certified Dermatologist and a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. She is an Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine. She is also the Director of Research in Cosmetic and Laser Medicine and the Founder and Director of the Boston University Center for Ethnic Skin. She received her Medical degree from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where she was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. After her internship at Northwestern University, she completed her dermatology residency at New York University (NYU). She is a recognized leader in medical and cosmetic dermatology. She is widely published in the peer-reviewed literature, author of several book chapters, and is a frequent lecturer at both national and international dermatology meetings. She is editor and lead author of a book entitled, “Beauty and Body Dysmorphic Disorder: A Clinician’s Guide”.

Abstract:

This lecture discusses the historical importance of beauty and offers an overview of the objective and subjective aspects of beauty to segue into a discussion of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). The lecture will begin with an analysis of what the human eye finds aesthetically pleasing including symmetry, averageness, sexual dimorphism, skin homogeneity, and proportions. Also to be discussed are how these biologic perceptions can be reshaped through individual, cultural, and historical influences. The course will then focus on disorders of self perception, BDD, including a discussion of the history, epidemiology, symptoms, diagnosis including use of questionnaires, and implications for treating physicians. The lecture will conclude by providing an algorithmic approach to persons with suspected BDD and treatment options. BDD occurs in 1-2% of the general population and 6-15% of dermatology and cosmetic surgery patients. In a BDD cohort, 50% sought treatment from a dermatologist and 33% requested cosmetic surgery. These patients are often unhappy with results with over 90% reporting symptoms unchanged or worsened after cosmetic procedures. This disorder is under recognized and should be approached with both sympathy and empathy given the high rate of suicidal ideation in these patients. Recognition and appropriate referral key to management.

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break @ Foyer 16:15-16:30